Notes: Projects
Progress at the new Berkeley Art Museum, photographed earlier today, 23 July 2014.

Progress at the new Berkeley Art Museum, photographed earlier today, 23 July 2014.

Reliquary.

Reliquary.

Not many writers have the gift of seeing themselves as others see them, and gossips, like critics, can be tolerated, and might even be enjoyed, as piano-players in the fun-house of letters.
Andrew O’Hagan, “Kitty still pines for his dearest Dub,” a review of David Plante, Becoming a Londoner, Bloomsbury, 2013, and Katherine Bucknell, ed., The Animals, Chatto, 2013, London Review of Books, 6 February 2014, page 21.
So many diaries and memoirs keep it zipped, going quiet at the good bits, censoring any scandal, allowing the writer to puff and genuflect and conceal his way to glory.
O’Hagan, LRB, 6 February 2014, page 21.
Charm may be useful in one’s dealings with others, but it is scarcely useful in one’s dealings with oneself, and has no place in a good diary.
O’Hagan, LRB, 6 February 2014, page 21.
'I felt oh, that I belonged to a little inner circle of people among whom one is famous, and if anyone looked at me as belonging to the little circle he or she might wonder who I was to belong to it.' The notion might seem pathetic but it said to be the hallmark of the true literary gossip.
O’Hagan quoting and commenting on Plante, LRB, 6 February 2014, page 21.
Unlike a good novelist, a good gossip should tell, not show.
O’Hagan, LRB, 6 February 2014, page 22.